Eventually………….its stopped raining

Nutbrook Aggregates yard at Ilkeston is now starting to dry up after one of the wettest spells on record and it’s time to produce 6F2, Type 1, Fill Sand and Screened Soil all of which come under the heading of Recycled Aggregates 6F2 Consists of: An aggregate composed of crushed concrete, brick and mortar produced as a by-product of demolition projects known in the trade as 6F2 Recycled Capping. Sizes range from 75mm down to dust. The term 6F2 Capping applies to a product that will vary in size depending on the supplier you use but we find that 75mm Crusher Run is a good general purpose aggregate. 6F2 Capping is mainly used a sub-base for roads and buildings although it has many other uses such as Piling Mats and general backfill. The coarse nature of 6F2 Capping makes it a very good all in one product which when compacted forms a hard wearing surface. 6F2 is ideal as an initial layer of hard-core before being finished off with a layer of type 1 sized material. Ideal for: hard-standings, haul roads, building sub-bases, path/road/highway/driveway/patio sub-bases, piling mats, another Nutbrook Aggregates material is Type1 Consists of: Type 1 Recycled Sub Base can be made from a range of materials such as Crushed Concrete, Crushed Rail Ballast or IBAA (Incinerator Bottom Ash Aggregate). Sizes range from 40mm down to dust to create an easily compacted  recycled aggregate. MOT Type 1 Recycled Sub Base is graded according to the Specification for Highway Works 803 (SHW 803). This is a great alternative to quarried Department of Transport Type 1 (Also known as MOT) and in most cases is cheaper. Ideal for: Hard-standings, haul roads, building sub-bases, path/road/highway/driveway/patio sub-bases. A must for applications that require material graded to a Type 1 specification. ********Celebration************** To celebrate 12 months of business on the 4th February I am giving away 3 Full Breakfasts to the first 3 people to wish either Garry or myself Happy Nutbrook Birthday!!!!!!   Regards Lee

Posted on January 20, 2016 at 8:51 am
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…Will it stop raining???

RainingThat’s the first week completed of 2016 and what a wet week its been, here at Nutbrook Aggregates we have witnessed a selection of rain showers from a quick shower to the torrential downpour when rain starts to bounce off the yard.

Later on this month Nutbrook Aggregates will be producing 6F2, Type 1 and Screened Soil and Dust to put on stock and as everybody is aware recycled aggregates is both cost effective and sustainable.

Recycled and secondary aggregates are making an increasingly important contribution to the UK’s needs.

By reducing demand on primary aggregates, they are helping the industry to become more sustainable – in other words, not using up assets today that our children may need tomorrow.

Some interesting news care of … http://www.mineralproducts.org/index.php

The use of recycled and secondary building materials in the GB aggregates market has increased rapidly, rising from 30 million tonnes pa in 1990 to over 70 mt in 2007. Over that period the share of the aggregates market supplied from recycled and secondary sources has risen from 10% to 25%. This 25% market share is three times higher than the European average, highlighting the fact that the use of recycled and secondary building materials in Britain is close to full potential.

Nutbrook Aggregates will be celebrating a milestone on the 4th February more details to follow next week

 

Posted on January 11, 2016 at 9:12 am
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2016

A Happy New Year to everybody from Nutbrook Aggregates.

I hope everybody’s had a good break and not made any resolutions that they cant keep!!

During the first quarter of 2016 Nutbrook Aggregates will be introducing Bulk Bags of our entire product range that will be available for collection or delivery

.Bulk Bag

Don’t forget that Nutbrook Aggregates may be able to collect large amounts of hard-core/rubble at very competitive rates [conditions apply]

 

****Phoning 0115 932 6969 will now put you directly in touch with Nutbrook Aggregates.

Posted on January 4, 2016 at 3:34 pm
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Not Long Now!!!!

On Friday at Nutbrook Aggregates we saw temperatures in double figures who would have thought it probably the warmest December on record….. better blow the dust off the barbeque and put the beers in the ice bucket, if you’re having a more traditional Christmas dinner try roasting the brussel sprouts absolutely fantastic and if anybody asks you about them tell them Nutbrook Aggregates suggested it.

The Nutbrook Aggregates Christmas raffle was drawn on Friday, theirs 5 prizes 4 off which are ‘liquid’ prizes so please call and check if its you!!!

 

The uses of aggregates are varied and well known. From construction work through to landscaping and road surfacing, aggregates have a thousand uses, despite being perhaps the least glamorous aspect of a job.

Although aggregates are, quite literally, the foundation and cornerstone of any project, very little consideration goes into their selection compared to materials used in other parts of construction. As long as it’s the correct type of material, it doesn’t matter, right?

Wrong! As with many things today, environmental concerns can impact on product choice. When designing a house few people would say that any old bricks will do, any glass or any tiles, and the same consideration should now be applied to aggregates.

Should You Use Recycled Materials?

At Nutbrook Aggregates we are delighted to be able to offer our customers a range of recycled aggregates, providing the same great quality and fulfilling all the roles of regular aggregates, but in more environmentally friendly way. Recycled aggregates can come from a wide variety of sources, including waste from building destruction, spare materials from road construction and even ballast from disused railways.

Recycled aggregates, whatever their origin, can provide real value when undertaking specifically environmentally friendly projects. From green eco-houses to modern garden design, the use of recycled aggregates can perfectly compliment the use of any other green materials you choose. Why build an eco-house and go through the effort of sourcing specialist materials but neglect to use responsible aggregates?

Far from only being useful in eco-projects or individual houses, recycled aggregates can be suitable for any job. In an age of environmental responsibility, it is important that businesses and governments are seen to be doing all they can to save the planet, and by supplementing existing plans with these new products any project can be made greener.

 

Posted on December 20, 2015 at 7:44 pm
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Christmas Wishes

Christmas 2015 is very nearly with us and Nutbrook Aggregates  would like to thank all customers, suppliers and potential customers a Very Merry Christmas and a Prosperous New Year.

Nutbrook Aggregates are running a Christmas raffle which will be drawn this coming Friday [18th] tickets are given to all drivers that bring in inert waste and /or any Nutbrook Aggregates material collected, prizes are: cases of Lager, Bitter, Cider and a Tub of Chocolates which have been donated by Rob Evans who maintains all Nutbrook Aggregates mobile plant, don’t forget ‘you’ve got to be in it to win it’,

Got to go……….soon be the X Factor finals.

Logo - Nutbrook Aggregates

 

Posted on December 13, 2015 at 7:14 pm
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Nutbrook welcome new General Manager Lee Watson

Lee Watson joins the company with over 25 years experience in the industry having worked for several leading Blue Chip aggregate sector. Lee is experienced in all material handling, process control, vehicle movements, Health and safety, customer relations and technical sales.

He will be responsible for the Nutbrook team at our recycling centre at Foundry Park, Ilkeston, Derbyshire.

Lee joins Nutbrook at an exciting time and is tasked with moving the business forwards in an ever-increasing  and demanding market.

Lee Watson“I’m excited to join Nutbrook and looking forward to the challenges that lie ahead in pushing Nutbrook to becoming a recognised name in recycled aggregates throughout the Midlands” says General Manager Lee.

Lee can be contacted directly on 07815 417 985 for any orders, enquiries or general information.

Posted on November 24, 2015 at 3:13 pm
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Viridor’s EfW contract for ‘carbon negative’ aggregate

Article first appeared 22nd June 2015 via MRW.co.uk

Viridor has signed a 10-year deal with Carbon8 Aggregates to process and recycle air pollution control residue (APCR) into the latter’s award-winning aggregate product.

Viridor’s energy recovery plants in Exeter, Cardiff, Ardley and Peterborough will supply around 25,000 tonnes A year, which Grundon Waste Management will transport to Carbon8’s plant in Brandon, Suffolk. A second plant in Avonmouth is due to be operational at the end of the year and three more are planned.

APCR is a by-product of the filtering process to clean exhaust gases and is typically sent to landfill.

Carbon8 uses accelerated carbonation technology to turn the residue into a lightweight aggregate that can be used to produce building blocks. The process captures more carbon dioxide than is generated during manufacturing, making the blocks carbon-negative.

The company won the Best Recycled Product category at the 2013 National Recycling Awards. Small blocks of the aggregate were used as trophies in 2014 and will be presented again at the 2015 event on 1 July.

The Environment Agency accepts that the aggregate is ‘end of waste’ material and is a product in its own right.

Viridor says the contract, which has an option for a further five years, allows the company to continue its zero waste to landfill goals.

Stuart Sim, EfW director, said the company was excited to be among the industry leaders in using this technology.

“We are committed to giving the world’s resources new life, and seeing our residues recycled and become carbon-negative products within the construction industry really demonstrates clear progress on resource efficiency in this important and growing part of our sector,” he said.

Richard Skehens, chairman of Carbon8 and former chief executive of Grundon, said: “The investment by Grundon into the Carbon8 Aggregates business recognised the huge potential for recycling APCR into aggregate, thereby providing a genuine zero-waste to landfill option.

“This contract asserts Carbon8’s position as the market leader in APCR recycling.”

Posted on November 12, 2015 at 12:08 pm
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Time to unlock the value of household textile waste, says WRAP

New research from WRAP suggests it’s time to unlock the potential economic value of discarded textiles thrown out by consumers for waste collection.

The new report reveals that consumers are throwing out almost one million tonnes of textiles, mainly clothes, shoes and linens like bedding and curtains, every year. But these unwanted items, which currently end up in landfill, could be re-used or recycled – and generate millions of pounds.

“In 2010, we threw out an estimated £238m-worth of textiles for waste collection and sent to landfill, yet all of this could have been re-used, recycled or sent for energy recovery,” said WRAP director Marcus Gover.

“If we were to recover just 10% of that household textile waste, we could potentially unlock revenues of around £24m. If we were to increase this figure to match what has already been achieved in recycling and re-use of other household waste materials, this amount could be even higher.

“It’s true that we do recycle and re-use a lot more of our unwanted textile items now than in the past, but this mainly comprises clothing, and our latest research shows how much more there is still to be done.

“We know that there’s both infrastructure and reprocessing capacity out there, so there’s a challenge here to make sure people are aware, not only of the implications of sending textiles to landfill, but also of the different collection opportunities available for all unwanted textiles – and not just clothes.”

Textiles flow and market development opportunities in the UK is a comprehensive study of textiles flows in the UK. As well as highlighting the potential value in household textile waste, it also emphasises the opportunities to increase mattress recovery, and rag and fibre recycling from discarded carpets, and examines both new recycling and potential market opportunities.

“Carpet recycling is growing fast from a very low starting point, and there are already a number of innovative methods and end markets for the recycled material, but further development of these is needed to ensure recycling is commercially viable,” said Marcus.

“Mattress recovery is more difficult, but with the market price of steel steadily rising, it’s an area of growing interest and value – some mattresses contain as much as 50% steel. In 2010, an estimated 84,500 tonnes of steel alone could have been recovered.”

WRAP is also launching three other related reports as part of its work on textiles. These cover commercial sources of clothing for re-use and recycling, as well as household.

The Branded Workwear Report reveals that only 10% of no-longer-required work clothing is currently recycled or re-used and suggests the steps that could be taken to reduce waste and encourage re-use.

Impact of Textile Feedstock Source on Value assesses the impact that differing sources of recovered textiles has on the quality, and the subsequent value, of those textiles within the UK re-use and recycling markets. The results from the WRAP trials will help the textile recycling sector identify which sources generate the highest value returns in existing and new markets.

The third report investigates the economic and environmental impacts of washing and drying contaminated textiles for re-use and recycling markets.

At the same time, WRAP is launching new guidance to help local authorities and textiles collectors increase re-use and recycling, and reduce the amount of textiles being disposed of in residual waste. It provides practical advice and examples of existing good practice for kerbside textile collection services, bring banks (where members of the public can bring item for re-use and recycling), and community re-use initiatives.

It also offers advice on how to communicate textile re-use and recycling services to the public.

“If you consider the findings of this latest research into textiles and factor in the results of our Valuing our Clothes report which we issued in July, it’s clear that the whole area of textiles re-use and recycling offers enormous potential,” said Marcus.

“What our research demonstrates is that there are real opportunities here for organisations and individuals to reduce our carbon footprint by diverting textiles from landfill and extracting the maximum financial end economic benefits available from smarter re-use and recycling.

“WRAP’s role isn’t just about providing the sound research that spotlights the best areas for focus. It’s also about taking steps to help organisations tap into this potential. The new guidance we’re launching is just part of that work.”

WRAP is now planning to look in detail at the types of recycling technologies that exist, and their commercial viability.

“We’ll also be researching the global rag and fibre market with a view to identifying ways of growing existing and developing new markets for all the materials identified in our textiles flow report,” added Marcus.

Posted on November 12, 2015 at 12:08 pm
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Viridor’s EfW contract for ‘carbon negative’ aggregate

Article first appeared 22nd June 2015 via MRW.co.uk

Viridor has signed a 10-year deal with Carbon8 Aggregates to process and recycle air pollution control residue (APCR) into the latter’s award-winning aggregate product.

Viridor’s energy recovery plants in Exeter, Cardiff, Ardley and Peterborough will supply around 25,000 tonnes A year, which Grundon Waste Management will transport to Carbon8’s plant in Brandon, Suffolk. A second plant in Avonmouth is due to be operational at the end of the year and three more are planned.

APCR is a by-product of the filtering process to clean exhaust gases and is typically sent to landfill.

Carbon8 uses accelerated carbonation technology to turn the residue into a lightweight aggregate that can be used to produce building blocks. The process captures more carbon dioxide than is generated during manufacturing, making the blocks carbon-negative.

The company won the Best Recycled Product category at the 2013 National Recycling Awards. Small blocks of the aggregate were used as trophies in 2014 and will be presented again at the 2015 event on 1 July.

The Environment Agency accepts that the aggregate is ‘end of waste’ material and is a product in its own right.

Viridor says the contract, which has an option for a further five years, allows the company to continue its zero waste to landfill goals.

Stuart Sim, EfW director, said the company was excited to be among the industry leaders in using this technology.

“We are committed to giving the world’s resources new life, and seeing our residues recycled and become carbon-negative products within the construction industry really demonstrates clear progress on resource efficiency in this important and growing part of our sector,” he said.

Richard Skehens, chairman of Carbon8 and former chief executive of Grundon, said: “The investment by Grundon into the Carbon8 Aggregates business recognised the huge potential for recycling APCR into aggregate, thereby providing a genuine zero-waste to landfill option.

“This contract asserts Carbon8’s position as the market leader in APCR recycling.”

Posted on November 12, 2015 at 12:07 pm
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Time to unlock the value of household textile waste, says WRAP

New research from WRAP suggests it’s time to unlock the potential economic value of discarded textiles thrown out by consumers for waste collection.

The new report reveals that consumers are throwing out almost one million tonnes of textiles, mainly clothes, shoes and linens like bedding and curtains, every year. But these unwanted items, which currently end up in landfill, could be re-used or recycled – and generate millions of pounds.

“In 2010, we threw out an estimated £238m-worth of textiles for waste collection and sent to landfill, yet all of this could have been re-used, recycled or sent for energy recovery,” said WRAP director Marcus Gover.

“If we were to recover just 10% of that household textile waste, we could potentially unlock revenues of around £24m. If we were to increase this figure to match what has already been achieved in recycling and re-use of other household waste materials, this amount could be even higher.

“It’s true that we do recycle and re-use a lot more of our unwanted textile items now than in the past, but this mainly comprises clothing, and our latest research shows how much more there is still to be done.

“We know that there’s both infrastructure and reprocessing capacity out there, so there’s a challenge here to make sure people are aware, not only of the implications of sending textiles to landfill, but also of the different collection opportunities available for all unwanted textiles – and not just clothes.”

Textiles flow and market development opportunities in the UK is a comprehensive study of textiles flows in the UK. As well as highlighting the potential value in household textile waste, it also emphasises the opportunities to increase mattress recovery, and rag and fibre recycling from discarded carpets, and examines both new recycling and potential market opportunities.

“Carpet recycling is growing fast from a very low starting point, and there are already a number of innovative methods and end markets for the recycled material, but further development of these is needed to ensure recycling is commercially viable,” said Marcus.

“Mattress recovery is more difficult, but with the market price of steel steadily rising, it’s an area of growing interest and value – some mattresses contain as much as 50% steel. In 2010, an estimated 84,500 tonnes of steel alone could have been recovered.”

WRAP is also launching three other related reports as part of its work on textiles. These cover commercial sources of clothing for re-use and recycling, as well as household.

The Branded Workwear Report reveals that only 10% of no-longer-required work clothing is currently recycled or re-used and suggests the steps that could be taken to reduce waste and encourage re-use.

Impact of Textile Feedstock Source on Value assesses the impact that differing sources of recovered textiles has on the quality, and the subsequent value, of those textiles within the UK re-use and recycling markets. The results from the WRAP trials will help the textile recycling sector identify which sources generate the highest value returns in existing and new markets.

The third report investigates the economic and environmental impacts of washing and drying contaminated textiles for re-use and recycling markets.

At the same time, WRAP is launching new guidance to help local authorities and textiles collectors increase re-use and recycling, and reduce the amount of textiles being disposed of in residual waste. It provides practical advice and examples of existing good practice for kerbside textile collection services, bring banks (where members of the public can bring item for re-use and recycling), and community re-use initiatives.

It also offers advice on how to communicate textile re-use and recycling services to the public.

“If you consider the findings of this latest research into textiles and factor in the results of our Valuing our Clothes report which we issued in July, it’s clear that the whole area of textiles re-use and recycling offers enormous potential,” said Marcus.

“What our research demonstrates is that there are real opportunities here for organisations and individuals to reduce our carbon footprint by diverting textiles from landfill and extracting the maximum financial end economic benefits available from smarter re-use and recycling.

“WRAP’s role isn’t just about providing the sound research that spotlights the best areas for focus. It’s also about taking steps to help organisations tap into this potential. The new guidance we’re launching is just part of that work.”

WRAP is now planning to look in detail at the types of recycling technologies that exist, and their commercial viability.

“We’ll also be researching the global rag and fibre market with a view to identifying ways of growing existing and developing new markets for all the materials identified in our textiles flow report,” added Marcus.

Posted on November 12, 2015 at 12:07 pm
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